review: Knits from the Heart of Norway

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Knits from the Heart of Norway: 30 sweaters, hats, socks, and mittens inspired by the Telemark Region by Irene Haugland

Scandinavian knitting has such a distinctive style and rich history and this book celebrates both. All of the designs are advanced in terms of colorwork (I’m not sure you could do justice to Norwegian knitting otherwise) but you do feel as though any of these items will become family heirlooms, so the effort put in is worth it for the gorgeous results. All designs are pictured in full color photos with close-up shots of specific details, and the photographs are taken out in nature in beautiful settings that only enhance the beauty of the knitwear.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Capital Area District Library through the MeLCat ILL system

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review: Simple Color Knitting

Simple Color Knitting

Simple Color Knitting: A complete how-to-knit-with-color workshop with 20 projects by Erika Knight

Working with beautiful, colorful yarn is one of the joys of knitting. Even a monochrome project can be gorgeous if the color is pleasing. The introductory sections of this book give background on color theory, various techniques for using colors, and a gallery of swatches illustrating different techniques. The projects then start with a monochrome throw, with the intent that the yarn color used will make a statement when juxtaposed with the furniture (of a different color) it will sit on. The following projects use phasing, stripes, color-based stitch patterns, and other techniques to create a sweater, pillows, mittens, throws, and more. The intense colors used and the quality of the photographs will provide inspiration as well.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Capital Area District Library through the MeLCat ILL system

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review: Handmade Heirlooms

Handmade Heirlooms

Handmade Heirlooms: Crafting with intention, making things that matter, and connecting to family & tradition by Jennifer Casa

This book embraces the idea of family heirlooms being special keepsakes that are, more often than not, handmade by someone in the family. One doesn’t often think of creating new heirlooms, but this book challenges the reader to do just that – instead of simply making a gift for a family member, make something that will be loved by that person and handed down over the years. These projects are made using a variety of techniques including knitting, crochet, sewing, and more. They range from traditional baby items like booties and caps to more unique objects like a knitted airplane toy. Some are more utilitarian, like a knitting needle roll and a monogrammed bulletin board.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the East Lansing Public Library through the MeLCat ILL system

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Spring Showers and Spring Flowers Blythe Swap

This was such a fun swap to put together! My partner and I figured out quickly that we both like the Mori Girl style and that really informed my process for making things. I got so excited about it! I wrote a few new patterns for knitted items (see yesterday’s freebie for one!) and sewed a bunch. Here’s a quick look at the things I sent:

And the awesome package I received:

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April freebie!

It’s a new month and I have a new free pattern to share!

Linden Bag for Blythe

Introducing the Linden Bag for Blythe! I wanted to create a really easy-to-make bag for Blythe that could be made to suit a number of different styles. As you can see from the photos here, I went with Mori style, and I made two bags from different yarns. You can see that the texture of each bag is slightly different, which is a result of the yarns being different. The green one is a fractionally thinner yarn made from alpaca, which is a little less fluffy than the cream yarn, which is merino. You can make the strap the thickness you like and as it also forms the sides of the bag, construction is super simple and finishing doesn’t take very long. When you’re done, you can embellish it in whatever way suits you. You could also make it smaller for Middie or super tiny for Petite.

Linden Bag for Blythe

Download this free pattern on Ravelry, LoveKnitting, and Craftsy.

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Sweet Helena

Helena Sweater for Blythe by AnneArchy

My plan for this sweater was to make something that suits a mohair or mohair blend lace weight yarn and is reversible (can be worn cardigan style or pullover style) – and I succeeded! This sweet sweater is knit using garter stitch, which really works in this type of lofty yarn. It has a collar that looks great no matter which way you wear it, and is a lovely simple canvas for your embellishments. The short sleeves work well with the lightweight feel of the yarn, making this a perfect sweater for spring.

Ravelry, Etsy, LoveKnitting, and Craftsy

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Anchors Aweigh!

Anchors Aweigh Sweater for Blythe

Ahoy! Fashion above deck! This three-quarter length sleeve sweater for Blythe is nautical-inspired but fashionable in any situation. It has a narrow stripe and roll neck and is a classic style. I originally designed this back in 2011 for a swap and recently found my pattern notes and made it again, so here it is!

Heave ho-ver to Ravelry, Etsy, LoveKnitting, and Craftsy to find this pattern.

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Batty for Bat Sweaters

Batty Sweater

Last Halloween I participated in a swap and made one of these sweaters for my swap partner. Bats are one of my favorite Halloween icons and I wanted this one to be mostly on the creepy side but maybe just a tad cute as well. This pattern is written and charted, so you can use whichever format you prefer!

Flap over to Ravelry, Etsy, Craftsy, and LoveKnitting to bite this pattern.

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Hannah-lujah

Hannah Sweater for Blythe

Hannah Abbott is a not-super-well-developed character in the Harry Potter series, but she IS a Hufflepuff and thus seems worthy of inspiring this sweater. This sweater is empire style with a fitted bodice that fits Blythe perfectly. It has a two-color star pattern that is sweet without being overly fussy.

Grab some flue powder and head to LoveKnitting, Ravelry, Etsy, and Craftsy to grab this pattern.

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