review: The Knitter’s Book of Knowledge

The Knitter's Book of Knowledge

The Knitter’s Book of Knowledge: A complete guide to essential knitting techniques by Debbie Bliss

Looking for a one-stop reference book for knitting? This is it. Bliss brings her legendary expertise and covers pretty much all the things you could think of in an informational knitting book. She includes yarn, needles, the basics of how to knit, understanding the terminology and techniques used in knitting, variations of knitting texture, finishing techniques, knitting design, and entire chapters devoted to color, embellishments, shaping, and knitting in the round. Illustrated throughout with color photographs and hand-drawn diagrams (some of the clearest/easiest-to-parse I’ve seen), this book is beautiful and useful, and is definitely one I’ll be adding to my own personal library.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Baldwin Public Library through the MeLCat interlibrary loan system

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review: The Aromatherapy Garden

The Aromatherapy Garden

The Aromatherapy Garden: Growing fragrant plants for happiness and well-being by Kathi Keville

I haven’t really explored the concept of aromatherapy before, but I definitely like to grow fragrant plants and find it satisfying to walk through the garden and smell them around me. This book starts off with some history of the use of fragrant plants and the basics of essential oils. Annoyingly there are a few comments that put me off, such as, “Primrose contains a trace of cinnamon scent, which is favored by men,” and “what women do not care for is the scent of cherry.” Really, though? Did you find some peer-reviewed data that prove this to be true? There are references to studies, but no specifics and I find these kind of generalities difficult to believe. This makes me skeptical of the other claims contained in this book, so I ended up using it as inspiration via the lovely color photos of plants and gardens and as a source for making a list of fragrant plants I might want to grow.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Baldwin Public Library via the MeLCat interlibrary loan system

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review: Fix Your Garden

Fix Your Garden

Fix Your Garden: How to make small spaces into green oases by Jane Moseley & Jackie Strachan, illustrations by Claire Rollet

This cute book is designed as a guide to creating your garden, whether it be a big yard, balcony pots, or something in between (most of the information is written to an audience working with an in-ground garden plot, though). It starts with the basics and features homey illustrations throughout, providing inspiration and occasional chuckles (such as with adorable depictions of pests like ‘Mrs. Earwig’). The goal of creating a cottage garden is referenced several times and fits well with the design of the book. As this was published in the UK, resources listed are UK-based.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Baldwin Public Library through the MeLCat interlibrary loan system

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review: Mixing Quilt Elements

Mixing Quilt Elements

Mixing Quilt Elements: a modern look at color, style & design by Kathy Doughty of Material Obsession

Doughty is an Australian quilt blogger, speaker, fabric designer, and so forth, and she traveled throughout Australia to photograph the quilts in this book. The resulting photos are gorgeous and though the background is often only just barely visible in the shot, the natural light and contrast of the backgrounds really works to showcase the lovely quilt work. Doughty espouses a slow approach to quilting, taking the time to hand piece and stitch and really appreciate the process. This doesn’t mean she skimps on the little things, though, as each one is highly detailed and the finished pieces have a harmonious blend of a lot of things going on. Familiar shapes and styles are found in each quilt, including log cabin, wedges, rings, octagons, and many more. Pattern pieces are included in a perforated section in the back.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Baldwin Public Library through the MeLCat interlibrary loan system

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review: All the Presidents’ Gardens

All the Presidents' Gardens

All the Presidents’ Gardens: Madison’s Cabbages to Kennedy’s Roses – How the White House Grounds Have Grown with America by Marta McDowell

This book traces the role gardens have played at the White House from the 1790s to 2015. Color images are included throughout the book: paintings, drawings, plans, and photographs of the grounds, gardens, greenhouses, statues, seed catalog and magazine pages, and more. There is a short section with paragraph biographies of the fourteen men (yes, all men, BOO) who have served as First Gardener and another listing all the plants known to have been planted at the White House. I found it interesting to learn more about which presidents and first ladies were super into the garden being a vital part of the White House Grounds and how this changed over time in light of different political events.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Baldwin Public Library through the MeLCat ILL system

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