Heroes

The CMU Art Gallery had a show earlier this winter called Heroes, which featured artwork that addressed that concept in some way. It was terrific!

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

Linda Stein is a multimedia artist who creates for what she terms gender justice. All the works on display as part of this show had feminist themes and focused, as per the show theme, on superheroes.

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

I really enjoy the way she mixes media in unexpected ways to extend the themes of her artwork. Hers is the kind of art I could look at for hours and keep noticing new things.

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

Mark Newport‘s knitted superhero costumes are life-size or larger and are really impressive to see up close and in person.

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

I enjoy the ways that Newport plays with texture, color, and knitting techniques in these supersuits.

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

Brett Sauve is a sculptor whose work I’ve seen around town before. I really dig his style and it was neat to see some of his 2D art as well.

Heroes exhibit at CMU Art Gallery

Delita S. Martin‘s displayed works use a variety of techniques to create layered, detailed, powerful works. Her combination of hand-stitching, printing, and collage is really striking.

I wish I could tell you to go check out this exhibit, but sadly we visited it on the last day and it’s now gone! Hopefully it’ll come back again at some point, as it is well worth checking out and I’d gladly go back to spend more time with these pieces.

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Earth Stories: SAQA art quilt exhibit

I recently drove down to Lansing to see an art exhibit called Earth Stories, which features art created by members of the Studio Art Quilt Association. Artists were asked to pick a project that was important to them and then create an art quilt that would embody the goals of the project. The pieces in this show were then selected by Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, an artist, writer, and curator known for her work with African American quilts.

SAQA art quilt exhibit :earth stories
One of my favorites was this piece, Alternative vs Fossil Fuels, by Cynthia St. Charles.

SAQA art quilt exhibit :earth stories
There is a fairly large installation of wind turbines in the county south of where we live and they are something to behold. This quilt effectively conveys the enormity of these machines, and the quilting pattern she used very much feels like wind. This piece is also very detailed and there is a lot to notice the longer you look at it.

SAQA art quilt exhibit :earth stories
One of the coolest (for me) features of this exhibit is that each artist provided a notebook detailing the creative process that went into making their piece. Both as a quilter and a person interested in art, it is fascinating to look into someone else’s process and see how they came to create the work on display.

There are a bunch of other quilts from this show that drew my eye and you can check out more photos on my flickr. I made it to see this exhibit just before it left to go to its next location. I had just a couple of hours to spend here but I could have spent weeks! If you have a chance to see it, I recommend it!

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S-A-TUR-DAY Afternoon!

Yesterday was just the kind of day I love. We woke up and had some delicious scram with spinach and ham (courtesy of awesome K) and had a leisurely morning doing laundry and catching up on reading and social media. Then we headed out to see some exhibits! We saw the current exhibit at the Baber Room, which I’ll post about separately later this week. We then hit the new exhibit at the Clarke Historical, which is entitled Photography: Process, People & Preservation.

Photography: Process, People & Preservation exhibit at the Clarke Historical Library

This exhibit is really nicely curated. The graphics and displays are eye-catching and convey a lot of information without overwhelming you.

Photography: Process, People & Preservation exhibit at the Clarke Historical Library

Check out this print of the Marching Chips before they were the Marching Chips. Quite a far cry from the 250+ people I marched with when I was a student.

Photography: Process, People & Preservation exhibit at the Clarke Historical Library

The exhibit has a lot of information about a variety of photographic techniques and formats, with examples of many types of prints and negatives.

Photography: Process, People & Preservation exhibit at the Clarke Historical Library

They even included some nostalgic examples like these flash cubes, which I remember just a little from when I was a young kid.

Photography: Process, People & Preservation exhibit at the Clarke Historical Library

Also included are some neat vintage and antique cameras and, like in this case, advertisements and information about them. I love the image of this person being amazed by the photo they’re taking while they’re taking it.

Things have been so busy lately that it was really nice to just have a day to do exactly what we wanted to and not have other obligations or deadlines looming. I recently did a professional thing that I worked really hard on and which came with a lot of nervousness and anxiety, and I am so glad that I did it (and that it’s over). I accomplished a thing that I was pretty sure I wouldn’t even get the chance to do, and it feels good to have done it. I’ve also had a variety of other things going on that were weighing on me (huzzah for mammograms! But even more for follow-up mammograms that turn out to be nothing!) and it feels so good to just be. Anyway.

After the photography exhibit, we attempted to see the current faculty exhibit at the art museum, but apparently whoever was supposed to work there today didn’t show up, as the doors were locked and no one appeared to be around. Too bad, as it was CMU and You day and campus was packed with people who could have enjoyed seeing the art. We’ll try again another day.

Then we did a little retail exploration, including picking up some seasonal brews at a local liquor store (verdict: their selection of craft beers and ciders was okay, but nothing to write home about. We’ll try another shop next time – locals, any recommendations?) and some sausages at the local meat market (verdict: YUM. The market is attached to the meat processing facility, so these were made on site and you can really tell that they’re superior quality). Then on to the fabric store to pick up some crafty bits and fabric as I work on putting together my Halloween package for the Blythe Swap Group. After lunch, I sewed and crafted some of the goodies for that swap package and I’m so pleased at how everything is coming together. It’s not even halfway through the month and I’m almost finished! I’m truly not sure how that happened.

Followed up by an evening of chilling and enjoying some good TV (new Doctor Who!) and the company of each other and Coraline the Wonder Snuggler, it was a really nice day.

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Walt Disney World: Epcot

We spent our first full day at WDW at Epcot, as we were antsy to get to the International Food & Wine Festival. It did not disappoint! We sampled some delicious food, beer, and wine from a variety of nations.
Karl and Anne at Cities in Wonderland

We rode the Test Track, which theoretically simulates the tests that auto manufacturers, and where I found a hidden Mickey.
hidden Mickey at Test Track

In Japan, we saw a really neat exhibit of tin toys.
Japanese tin toys exhibit

tin toy cars

Tin Robot and Karl

I’m so glad we went to Disney during the Food and Wine festival. I also really enjoyed the Living With the Land boat ride, which tours the greenhouses Epcot uses for experimental gardening. We wanted to do the Behind the Seeds tour, but ran out of time.

geodesic dome at Epcot

Anne and Karl at Epcot

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