review: Dresden Carnival

Dresden Carnival

Dresden Carnival: 16 Modern Quilt Projects *Innovative Designs* by Marian B. Gallian and Yvette Marie Jones

Dresden plates are a classic and these designs play with the original idea in a variety of ways. Many but not all of these designs are floral – dresden plates lend themselves so well to floral motifs – and range from very traditional to more modern. This book includes pattern pieces (which could be copied or traced from the page) throughout as well as larger pieces in a perforated section (for easy removal) in the back.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Capital Area District Library through the awesome MeLCat ILL system

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review: 20 to Make: Modern Needlepoint

20 to Make: Modern Needlepoint

20 to Make: Modern Needlepoint by Jayne Schofield

This book is just what the title says: 20 needlepoint patterns (and not a lot more). There is a brief 2-page section listing useful information on materials, how to start, how to read a chart, finishing, and blocking, but otherwise the book assumes that the reader is already experienced in needlepoint and/or is a quick study. The patterns are charted in full color with symbols and are easy to read, though personally I’d prefer it if they had row and column numbers (being a knitter, I’m used to that – I’m not experienced enough in needlepoint to know if it’s the norm there). The patterns are cute (some a little on the country-craftsy side) and feature a range of subjects from flowers to animals to homes and more.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Jackson District Library through the awesome MeLCat ILL system

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review: Modern Roots

Modern Roots

Modern Roots: Today’s Quilts from Yesterday’s Inspiration by Bill Volckening

One of the charms of vintage and antique quilts is that they were often made by hand without the use of rulers and rotary cutters, so they aren’t as technically perfect as some quilts made today. They can feel more person-made and the connection to the quilt-maker can feel stronger. This book takes inspiration from those handmade quilts and shows how to make your own, whether you choose to make it using contemporary techniques or not. Many of the dozen patterns here will be familiar to quilters: Log Cabin, Lone Star, Stacked Bars, Barn Raising, and many others. Each pattern features a full page, full color photo of a vintage or antique quilt along with notes about its origin; a materials list; and instructions for cutting, construction, assembly, and finishing. Diagrams are provided for piecing and assembly. A smaller version is also provided for each pattern. Only two of the original quilts are tied but note that they can be finished however the maker desires.

full disclosure: I borrowed this book from the Galesburg Charleston Memorial District Library through the awesome MeLCat interlibrary loan system

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