frost on the lettuce

We’ve had a generally warmer-than-usual winter again this year, but at least we’ve had a little bit of snow and more than a couple frosty mornings. I did a hideously bad job of getting in-focus close-ups during this photo shoot, probably because it was really cold out and I neglected to properly bundle up before heading out.

frost on lettuce

I’m semi-embarrassed to even post this photo, because it is evidence of me being too lazy to put all the patio containers in the garage this year. But the frost on these teensy lettuce leaves (which are, yes, encased in ice – more evidence of my laziness since I neglected to dump out the water that accumulated after the previous thaw) was too neat not to share.

frost on the clover

The clover was really neat looking, too.

frost on a Morning Glory seed pod

And my favorite shot: a morning glory seed pod with frost on it, and the neat pattern the frost made on the black fence. Even the little hairs on the morning glory vine have teensy bits of frost on! This is where my laziness is rewarded – theoretically I should have cleared away all the morning glory vines, but I never quite finished that task before winter arrived.

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pretty in surprise pink

This year I planted a couple varieties of Morning Glory seeds that I’d gotten in trade from other gardeners. One variety is dark purple with magenta-y stripes:

these morning glories are very pollen-y

The other is a lighter, blueish purple that has darker purple stripes:

morning glories

As it turns out, there is also a third type of bloom that just showed up: pink!

morning glory

Here’s a shot where you can see all three:

morning glories

I really like growing these. They’re extremely low-maintenance and are such a lovely sight first thing in the morning. They’ve also attracted so many pollinators and make a nice addition to the back yard landscape.

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pollen freaks

The morning glories I planted this year have been doing really, really well. They must like the soil in the back yard.

They keep blooming and reblooming, and both types I planted seem to be doing well.

out of control back yard and gardens

morning glories

morning glory

We have even had a few days lately where it was really overcast and they were fooled into continuing to bloom well into the afternoon.

The pollinators seem to love them as much as I do. I have frequently noticed what has become a common sight: a bee entering and then backing out of a bloom, totally covered in pollen.

these morning glories are very pollen-y

Even fading blooms are still attractive.

these morning glories are very pollen-y

I usually look at bees to see if they’re wearing their pollen pants, but these guys have been coated head to toe!

these morning glories are very pollen-y

Many days we also see blooms with a dusting of pollen on the petals.

these morning glories are very pollen-y

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