estate sale cuteness

This weekend I ventured out to a few estate and yard sales and found a couple of cute things for barely any bucks.

Estate sale haul

This is most of what I got – I also picked up two bushel baskets which I didn’t bring inside yet. This is in hope that we will have fruit to store in the basement!

I will likely make this scarf into Blythe clothing, and stacked are a bunch of brand new in plastic greeting cards.

Estate sale haul

And check out this wee basket and thread spools! The spools are a bit out of scale for Blythe but super cute and were in with the basket so I got them as a package deal.

Estate sale haul

Finally, this adorbs embroidered brooch. I often use a brooch to hold a handknit scarf in place, and this is perfect for that. I think it’s just so sweet!

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FO Friday: Winter Flame

As you may recall, I ordered some yarn online to make a scarf for my mom for xmas. The yarn turned out not to be the color it appeared in the listing, and although I was still pleased with the item I made with it, I still wanted to look for something more accurately red.

Winter Flame scarf

This yarn is exactly what I was hoping for the first time! It has a mix of red tones that go darker rather than lighter, and there’s a very subtle metallic gold in there, too. I made the Winter Flame scarf for my mom for her birthday, and this time it really hit the mark.

Winter Flame scarf

I like the rolling waves of this stitch pattern. It’s not too fussy but still allows for a pleasing open weave which works well with a yarn of this light weight.

Winter Flame scarf

It’s geometric without feeling mechanical or rigid; organic but ordered.

Winter Flame scarfI am quite pleased with how this turned out. I would absolutely buy yarn from this seller again (The Cyborg’s Craft Room), and the scarf is a perfect fit with the jacket my mom had hoped to wear it with. Hooray for success!

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FO Friday: Hufflepuff Scarf

I’ve been wanting to make myself a Hufflepuff scarf for quite some time – years, probably. I finally pushed it to the top of my to-make list and now it’s done!

Hufflepuff Trapped Bar Scarf

I looked at a number of pattern choices before deciding how to make mine. I mostly followed the Hogwarts Scarf MkII pattern from The Come And Go Room, with a few small alterations.

Hufflepuff Trapped Bar Scarf

I knew that I wanted my scarf to be primarily black, as that goes with my general style and wardrobe. I like the way it turned out: the gold stripes are a nice accent, but it’s not too overwhelmingly bright.

Hufflepuff Trapped Bar Scarf

As you’ll notice, I didn’t make my scarf as long as those in the movie (14 sets of trapped bars) or even in the pattern (10 sets of trapped bars). I went with nine sets of trapped bars, since that seemed to be a good length for me while maintaining easy wear without too much likelihood of tripping over it or having it flapping around too much. As it is, the scarf is quite wide so it doesn’t need to be doubled up to provide a good warm layer. The 1×1 rib makes it nice and stretchy as well, and I think it’ll be nice and warm.

Hufflepuff Trapped Bar Scarf

I also made the fringe a bit longer than recommended because I thought it would look nice. The original movie scarves have quite a short fringe that is just in the color of the main scarf body, but I chose to alternate colors for a little extra flair.

Hufflepuff Trapped Bar Scarf

I’m quite pleased with how it turned out! It took quite awhile to knit (compared to my usual, anyway) because the 1×1 rib is a slow-growing stitch pattern. I’m excited to start wearing it!

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pinkie boucle

This scarf is part of my continuing effort to destash and is also due to my renewed enthusiasm for building up my work-appropriate scarf collection. My building is usually kept at a pretty brisk temperature and since I sit still in my office most of the day, I definitely need an assortment of scarves to keep me comfortable.

Pinkie boucle scarf on the needles

You can see in the photo above that this yarn knits up really nicely in an open stitch pattern. Even before blocking (as above), it has a nice drape and the pattern starts to come out.

Pinkie Boucle Scarf blocking

In the shot above, it is on the blocking boards and the pattern really opens up.

Pinkie boucle scarf blocking

Finding a good spot to block long scarves is always a challenge, but luckily the guest room was unoccupied.

Pinkie Boucle Scarf

Here it is after blocking. I’m quite pleased with how it turned out! My blocking wires are still packed away somewhere (I cannot for the life of me remember which box they’re in – not any of the boxes I’ve looked in so far!) but I was able to make do without them with only a few pin points around the edges.

Pinkie Boucle Scarf

This yarn is very light and has a terrific drape, thanks to it being made of a rayon fiber. I think an airy open stitch pattern works really well with this type of yarn.

Pinkie Boucle Scarf

These camera phone pics don’t really do it justice, but this yarn has a variety of shades of pink ranging from very light, soft pink to an intense magenta.

Pinkie Boucle Scarf

This project also counts as part of my ongoing effort to bring some bright colors into my wardrobe while still remaining close enough to my comfort zone that I don’t feel awkward. Since I started it in August but finished in September, I was also able to count it as a detention project for the Harry Potter Knit Crochet House Cup. This month the classes are all part of a field trip to Diagon Alley, so this is my Leaky Cauldron project. (Go Hufflepuff!)

Pinkie Boucle Scarf

I’m quite pleased with this project and I’ll definitely be wearing this scarf to work soon.

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Ericka

Here is my first officially finished project of 2013: The Ericka Scarf

Ericka Scarf

I started this in late December, but then put it down to work on some other projects and ended up finishing it on the 2nd of January. Then of course it required blocking (not really required, actually, but I chose to block it to show off the stitch pattern).

Ericka Scarf

I really do need to get some blocking wires. It would make this process so much faster, and it would result in even edges rather than the slightly wavy ones I ended up with. Don’t get me wrong – I still love the way this scarf turned out, just a note for future improvement.

Ericka Scarf

I think my inclination to block was proved a good one, don’t you? The fabric has a really nice drape (thanks especially to the little bit of nylon mixed with the wool in this yarn) and I think that adds to the pleasing-ness of the variegated colorway.

Ericka Scarf

Ericka Scarf

All in all, a success! I was able to use this as detention homework for the HPKCHC since it was a WIP when the year started. Ten points to Hufflepuff! And another lovely scarf to add to the relatively small collection of things I’ve made for myself.

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Josephine

I finally came to the end of this beautiful rainbow yarn with this scarf.

Josephine Scarf for Blythe

I made up the pattern for this scarf on the fly and, while when I started I wasn’t exactly sure what it would look like, I’m really pleased with the result.

Josephine Scarf for Blythe

I love the wavy edge that this stitch pattern produced, and I think it works quite well with the natural progression of the rainbow colors in this yarn. Big thanks again to E for sharing her leftovers with me!

Josephine Scarf for Blythe

For myself I’m a big fan of long skinny scarves that can be wrapped around over and over, and I definitely like it here for Blythe, too.

Josephine Scarf for Blythe

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Rejuva Scarf

I haven’t made myself very many projects lately, and I’ve been wearing scarves almost every day this winter, so I decided to use this super-soft, very pretty yarn from my stash to make myself the Rejuva Scarf (free pattern I found on Ravelry, natch.)

Rejuva Scarf

Rejuva Scarf

This yarn is Knit Picks Stroll Hand-Painted in Make Believe. It’s a merino/nylon blend and is really soft – also good for people like me who have sensitive skin and are easily irritated by some animal-fiber yarns. The yarn is designed for making socks, but I think it works exceptionally well in this scarf pattern. Extra bonus: it’s superwash merino, so it’s easy to care for. The pattern was really easy, too, and is available in both written instructions and charted.

Rejuva Scarf

I love this colorway!

Rejuva Scarf

I can’t wait to wear it this coming week – I’ll try to remember to take some photos.

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Hot off the presses: Blythe scarves!

So I’ve recently found myself with some teensy scraps of yarn leftover from other projects – but in shades too beautiful to waste or let languish. So I jumped into making scarves for Blythe, and I’m really pleased with the results so far.

I started with some Patons Lace in Woodrose, and made this one: the Woodrose Scarf.

Ellis modeling the Woodrose Scarf for Blythe by AnneArchy

I’m pleased with the variegation in colors and how it looks in a basic garter stitch like this. I wasn’t sure how the fringe would turn out, either, but I like the way it did.

I had even a little bit more left, this bit in just the pink tones. Even the little bit of variegation brings a little interest, I think. This is the Woodrose II Scarf (couldn’t come up with a more creative name at the time).

Ellis modeling the Woodrose II Scarf for Blythe by AnneArchy

I myself am not a huge wearer of scarves with a lot of fringe, so I like the classic look of this style.

And the gorgeous yarn I used to make this Rainbow Rib Scarf is some more of that from which I made the Rainbow Sweater. I just love the rich colors, which I think suit Ellis quite well.

Ellis modeling the Rainbow Rib Scarf for Blythe by AnneArchy

So, you can expect plenty more of these to come! There will always be bits of yarn leftover at the ends of projects, right?

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Green Scarf, awaiting embroidery

green scarf

Disregard my zombie-ish appearance in this photo – I am here to request your assistance! I finished knitting this scarf but I want to add some embroidery embellishment, I’m just not sure what. Got an idea? I’m all ears for color, pattern, theme ideas, and any other suggestions you want to share.

Project details on Ravelry (free account required)

More photos on Flickr

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