quick project: jewelry drawer liner

I continue to grab brooches and other pieces of jewelry at rummage and yard sales and the drawer I’ve been keeping them in has been a big jumble.

Quilted drawer liner

You can see that there’s a wide variety of stuff in here and that it moves around every time I open the drawer, making it hard to see what I have and find specific things. I had the idea to make a quilted drawer liner to keep things more organized.

Quilted drawer liner

This is the simplest design – it’s just two pieces of fabric with one layer of cotton batting, sewn all around the edge and then turned right side out, and a double line of stitching around the edge (closing the gap through which I turned it, as well as providing a nice detail and some stability). I thought about quilting it more than this, but decided that this was good enough. As I was able to remove the drawer to do this, it was easy to measure and make the liner the exact size of the drawer.

Quilted drawer liner

While I was at it, I did some sorting and found a number of items to get rid of (including no fewer than 6 pairs of cheapo sunglasses that were either scratched or didn’t fit very well – all in the Goodwill basket now!) So here’s the drawer with everything laid out neatly on the liner. Isn’t that so pleasing?

Quilted drawer liner

And here’s the drawer in place, from my vantage point (I’m not super tall compared to this dresser, but I can easily see everything here). I still have other jewelry in drawer organizer unit (which does not fit into this dresser – it fit into a previous one we owned, so now it’s sitting on a shelf) holding earrings, chain necklaces, and some other assorted sundries, but these are the brooches, bracelets, rings, and necklaces that I’m looking for at a moment’s notice and/or are best stored laying out. I will admit I even found a few things during this sort that I had forgotten I owned!

Tutorial:
1. measure your drawer
2. cut two pieces of fabric 1″ larger than the drawer’s measurement (1″ wider and 1″ longer)
3. cut one piece of cotton batting the same size as the fabric
4. place fabric pieces right sides together, and layer them on top of the cotton batting (doesn’t matter which way) so the three pieces are all lined up
5. sew around the perimeter with a 1/2″ seam allowance, leaving a 5″ gap on one side (or big enough to get your hand in)
6. trim the excess from the seam allowance except at the gap (especially be sure to trim around the corners)
7. reach in through the gap and turn right side out – you may wish to use a corner poker to get the corners turned out fully)
8. press well with the edges of the gap turned in tidily
9. stitch around the perimeter, being sure the gap is sealed – I used a longer stitch for a nice top-stitched look
10. stitch around the perimeter again an even distance from the first line of stitching

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like sands through the hour glass…

…so are the days of my quilting. Time always rushes by when I’m sewing and I can never seem to make enough of it.

I’m continuing to work on the Modern Venus quilt, specifically the hourglass quilt blocks for the sky.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

I cut the squares using a rotary cutter and included room for seam allowances. Then, for one hourglass block, I selected two fabrics. It helped me at first to press one of the blocks diagonally so I could really see the line. After making a bunch of them, though, I found I didn’t need to press anymore. After cutting and pressing, I placed the squares right sides together and made sure the corners were matched up neatly.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

Then I sewed 1/4″ on either side of the pressed diagonal line. First one side…

Making hourglass quilt blocks

… and then the other.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

So I ended up with a piece that looks like this.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

I then used the rotary cutter to slice down the center, on the pressed diagonal line, cutting the block into two equal (identical) pieces.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

Then I pressed each of these two pieces open.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

After that, I matched up my new two blocks so that the contrasting fabrics were facing each other, right sides together. I made sure to align the center seams very precisely to ensure a neat result.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

Then I repeated the process of sewing 1/4″ to either side of the diagonal. First one side…

Making hourglass quilt blocks

… and then the second side.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

So then I had a block that looks like this.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

I sliced it in half with the rotary cutter and pressed the block open.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

The back of the block looks like this.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

And the front of the block looks like this! An hourglass pattern, as you can see, very precise and with a crisp spot where all four points meet in the middle.

Making hourglass quilt blocks

I need to make approximately 300 of these for the sky, and I’m almost done with that process. After that, I’ll make a final decision about what quilt block I want to use for the sea and select my fabrics for that section. I know I’d like a fairly simple block pattern since I’ll be making a lot of them, but I’m not sure exactly what it should be yet.

Have you ever used a particular technique to make a specific quilt block? I’d love to know what your favorites are!

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